Planet (Former) Advogato

This is a complement to Advogato, it is an aggregation of blogs of those who used to post on Advogato, but for one reason or another moved their blog from Advogato. It is provided as a service to those who would like to read the "greater Advogato" community.

This site works only as a Planet, it aggregates the post only, to comment on a blog entry, click on the title or time to go to the blog entry on the original site, hopefully it will have a comment facility.

April 17, 2014

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

I was just at Tesco

I was just at Tesco. I did not previously know the checkout person.

CHECKOUT PERSON: So, that'll be £16.48.
MARN: (long pause) What happened in 1648? I thought it was the Spanish Armada. But that sounds like it should have been in 1548.
CHECKOUT PERSON: Yeah, that's definitely the Tudors. It was under Henry, wasn't it? The Mary Rose and all that.
MARN: I thought it was Elizabeth. Didn't Philip of Spain send the Armada because he wanted her to marry him?
CHECKOUT PERSON: Well, what you've gotta remember is, Spain as such didn't exist at the time. There were, like, two or three different states there, and then you've got the Holy Roman Empire making things more complicated...

(discussion continues for a while)

More of this, please.

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/294738.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

April 17, 2014 08:19 PM

Bastien Nocera [hadess]

What is GOM¹

Under that name is a simple idea: making it easier to save, load, update and query objects in an object store.

I'm not the main developer for this piece of code, but contributed a large number of fixes to it, while porting a piece of code to it as a test of the API. Much of the credit for the design of this very useful library goes to Christian Hergert.

The problem

It's possible that you've already implemented a data store inside your application, hiding your complicated SQL queries in a separate file because they contain injection security issues. Or you've used the filesystem as the store and threw away the ability to search particular fields without loading everything in memory first.

Given that SQLite pretty much matches our use case - it offers good search performance, it's a popular thus well-documented project and its files can be manipulated through a number of first-party and third-party tools - wrapping its API to make it easier to use is probably the right solution.

The GOM solution

GOM is a GObject based wrapper around SQLite. It will hide SQL from you, but still allow you to call to it if you have a specific query you want to run. It will also make sure that SQLite queries don't block your main thread, which is pretty useful indeed for UI applications.

For each table, you would have a GObject, a subclass of GomResource, representing a row in that table. Each column is a property on the object. To add a new item to the table, you would simply do:

item = g_object_new (ITEM_TYPE_RESOURCE,
"column1", value1,
"column2", value2, NULL);
gom_resource_save_sync (item, NULL);

We have a number of features which try to make it as easy as possible for application developers to use gom, such as:
  • Automatic table creation for string, string arrays, and number types as well as GDateTime, and transformation support for complex types (say, colours or images).
  • Automatic database version migration, using annotations on the properties ("new in version")
  • Programmatic API for queries, including deferred fetches for results
Currently, the main net gain in terms of lines of code, when porting SQLite, is the verbosity of declaring properties with GObject. That will hopefully be fixed by the GProperty work planned for the next GLib release.

The future

I'm currently working on some missing features to support a port of the grilo bookmarks plugin (support for column REFERENCES).

I will also be making (small) changes to the API to allow changing the backend from SQLite to a another one, such as XML, or a binary format. Obviously the SQL "escape hatches" wouldn't be available with those backends.

Don't hesitate to file bugs if there are any problems with the API, or its documentation, especially with respect to porting from applications already using SQLite directly. Or if there are bugs (surely, no).

Note that JavaScript support isn't ready yet, due to limitations in gjs.

¹: « SQLite don't hurt me, don't hurt me, no more »

April 17, 2014 07:36 AM

April 16, 2014

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

Aubergine song

Most of my set last night wasn't quite this lewd, but this was the only song that got recorded!



This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/294578.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

April 16, 2014 10:03 PM

Mary Gardiner [hypatia]

The Sydney Project: Powerhouse Museum

This year is my son’s last year before he begins full time schooling in 2015. Welcome to our year of child-focussed activities in Sydney.

This was our second visit to the Powerhouse Museum, both times on a Monday, a day on which it is extremely quiet.

Bendy mirror

The Powerhouse seems so promising. It’s a tech museum, and we’re nerd parents, which ought to make this a family paradise. But not so. Partly, it’s that V is not really a nerdy child. His favourite activities involve things like riding his bike downhill at considerable speeds and dancing. He is not especially interested in machinery, intricate steps of causation, or whimsy, which removes a lot of the interest of the Powerhouse. Museums are also a surprising challenge in conveying one fundamental fact about recent history: that the past was not like the present in significant ways. V doesn’t really seem to know this, nor is he especially interested in it, which removes a lot of the hooks one could use in explaining, eg, the steam powered machines exhibit.

We started at The Oopsatoreum, a fictional exhibition by Shaun Tan about the works of failed inventor Henry Mintox. This didn’t last long; given that V doesn’t understand the fundamental conceit of museums and is not especially interested in technology, an exhibit that relies on understanding museums and having affection for technology and tinkering was not going to hold his attention. He enjoyed the bendy mirrors and that’s about it.

V v train

I was hoping to spend a moment in The Oopsatoreum, but he dragged me straight back out to his single favourite exhibit: the steam train parked on the entrance level. But it quickly palled too, because he wanted to climb on and in it, and all the carriages have perspex covering their doors so you can see it but not get in. There’s a bigger exhibit of vehicles on the bottom floor, including — most interestingly to me — an old-fashioned departures board showing trains departing to places that don’t even have lines any more, but we didn’t spend long there because V’s seen it before. He also sped through the steam machines exhibit pretty quickly, mostly hitting the buttons that set off the machines and then getting grumpy at the amount of noise they make.

Gaming, old-style

He was much more favourably struck with the old game tables that are near the steam train. He can’t read yet, and parenting him recently has been a constant exercise in learning exactly how many user interfaces assume literacy (TV remote controls, for example, and their UIs now as well). The games were like this to an extent too; he can’t read “Press 2 to start” and so forth, so I kept having to start the games for him. He didn’t do so well as he didn’t learn to operate the joystick and press a button to fire at the same time. He could only do one or the other. And whatever I was hoping V would get out of this visit, I don’t think marginally improved gaming skills were it, much as I think they’re probably going to be useful to him soon.

Big red car

We spent the most time in the sinkhole of the Powerhouse, the long-running Wiggles exhibition. This begins with the annoying feature that prams must be left outside, presumably because on popular days one could hardly move in there for prams. But we were the only people in there and it was pretty irritating to pick up my two month old baby and all of V’s and her various assorted possessions and lump them all inside with me. I’m glad V is not much younger, or I would have been fruitlessly chasing him around in there with all that stuff in my arms.

Car fixing

It’s also, again, not really the stereotypical educational museum experience. There’s a lot of memorabilia that’s uninteresting to children, such as their (huge) collection of gold and platinum records and early cassette tapes and such. There’s also several screens showing Wiggles videos, which is what V gravitates to. If I wanted him to spend an hour watching TV, I can organise that without leaving my house. He did briefly “repair” a Wiggles car by holding a machine wrench against it.

Overall, I think we’re done with the Powerhouse for a few years.

Cost: $12 adults, $6 children 4 and over, younger children free.

Recommended: for my rather grounded four year old, no. Possibly more suited to somewhat older children, or children who have an interest in a specific exhibit. (If that interest is steam trains, I think Train Works at Thirlmere is a better bet, although we cheated last year by going to a Thomas-franchise focussed day.)

More information: Powerhouse website.

April 16, 2014 03:41 AM

April 14, 2014

Bastien Nocera [hadess]

JDLL 2014 report

The 2014 "Journées du Logiciel Libre" took place in Lyon like (almost) every year this past week-end. It's a francophone free software event over 2 days with talks, and plenty of exhibitors from local Free Software organisations. I made the 600 metres trip to the venue, and helped man the GNOME booth with Frédéric Peters and Alexandre Franke's moustache.



Our demo computer was running GNOME 3.12, using Fedora 20 plus the GNOME 3.12 COPR repository which was working pretty well, bar some teething problems.

We kept the great GNOME 3.12 video running in Videos, showcasing the video websites integration, and regularly demo'd new applications to passers-by.

The majority of people we talked to were pretty impressed by the path GNOME has taken since GNOME 3.0 was released: the common design patterns across applications, the iterative nature of the various UI elements, the hardware integration or even the online services integration.

The stand-out changes for users were the Maps application which, though a bit bare bones still, impressed users, and the redesigned Videos.

We also spent time with a couple of users dispelling myths about "lightness" of certain desktop environments or the "heaviness" of GNOME. We're constantly working on reducing resource usage in GNOME, be it sluggishness due to the way certain components work (with the applications binary cache), memory usage (cf. the recent gjs improvements), or battery usage (cf. my wake-up reduction posts). The use of gnome-shell using tablet-grade hardware for desktop machines shows that we can offer a good user experience on hardware that's not top-of-the-line.

Our booth was opposite the ones from our good friends from Ubuntu and Fedora, and we routinely pointed to either of those booths for people that were interested in running the latest GNOME 3.12, whether using the Fedora COPR repository or Ubuntu GNOME.

We found a couple of bugs during demos, and promptly filed them in Bugzilla, or fixed them directly. In the future, we might want to run a stable branch version of GNOME Continuous to get fixes for embarrassing bugs quickly (such as a crash when enabling Zoom in gnome-shell which made an accessibility enthusiast tut at us).


GNOME and Rhône

Until next year in sunny Lyon.

(and thanks Alexandre for the photos in this article!)

April 14, 2014 04:46 PM

April 13, 2014

Rachel Chalmers [rachel]

less than angels, by barbara pym

Sexy, independent Catherine Oliphant is the best Pym heroine so far. No frustrated literary yearnings for her: she writes romantic fiction for women’s magazines. Even as she catches her beloved in the act of having an intimate dinner with her replacement, she thinks to herself that their moussaka will be getting cold. She chooses her next crush on the basis of his resemblance to an Easter Island statue. I adore her.

The church takes a step back in this book and the vacuum is filled by anthropology. The resulting shabby-intellectual milieu is surprisingly reminiscent of Iris Murdoch.

April 13, 2014 09:57 PM

Don Marti [dmarti]

Surveillance Marketing pays

Katrina Lerman of Communispace explains how surveillance marketing pays. First of all, people don't like being tracked in general.

We found that consumers overwhelmingly prefer anonymity online: 86 percent of consumers would click a “do not track” button if it were available and 30 percent of consumers would actually pay a 5 percent surcharge if they could be guaranteed that none of their information would be captured.

What would get them over their resistance? Discounts, of course.

On the flip side, consumers may be willing to share their data if there’s a clear value exchange: 70 percent said they would voluntarily share personal data with a company in exchange for a 5 percent discount.

Got it? This is some heavy Chief-Marketing-Officer-level stuff here, so pay attention. Yes, you'll be spending a lot of money on Big Data and all the highly paid surveillance marketing consultants and IT experts who go with it. (Big Data experts are a rare breed, and feed primarily on between-sessions croissants at Big Data conferences.)

But look what you get for that increase in the marketing budget. You get to cut your price to get people to sign up for it.

Somewhere this all makes sense. Maybe Bob Hoffman can explain it.

April 13, 2014 02:52 PM

April 12, 2014

Rachel Chalmers [rachel]

jane and prudence, by barbara pym

This is a lot of people’s favourite Pym novel, including Jilly Cooper’s and Pym’s herself. Maybe that’s because it is in part a retelling of Emma, one of Austen’s most charming books. As well as shuffling her own deck of archetypes, Pym has shuffled in several from Austen’s pack.

Prudence disliked being called ‘Miss Bates’; if she resembled any character in fiction, it was certainly not poor silly Miss Bates.

No, when she thought it over, Jane decided that she was really much more like Emma Woodhouse.

The romantic stranger is the widower Fabian Driver, who was serially unfaithful to his dead wife Constance (ouch.) The clergyman is married again, but Jane, his wife, is neither fish nor fowl: too ineffectual to be a helpmeet like Agatha Hoccleve, too lazy to be a thinker like Helena Napier. In her notes on the novel, Pym’s thumbnail sketch of Jane is devastating in its cruelty:

The wife sits on committees. Is literary, but no time for that now – perhaps had even wanted to do research (‘The influence of Somebody on Something’). Missed opportunities. Jane felt she has not been really successful – but a happy marriage and a child, people might say rather reproachfully, wasn’t that something?

And yet readers love Jane, and for good reason. Like the children of Elfine Starkadder and Richard Hawk-Monitor, she blazes with poetry in her soul. Her well-intentioned but blundering efforts to hook Prudence up are, like Emma Woodhouse’s, not punished with success. Only one marriage proposal is accepted in this book, and it is heartily regretted by almost all concerned.

Cameos: Dora’s awful brother William interrupts Prudence and Geoffrey to warn them against ordering the pate. We are given tragic news about Mildred Lathbury.

April 12, 2014 12:44 AM