Planet (Former) Advogato

This is a complement to Advogato, it is an aggregation of blogs of those who used to post on Advogato, but for one reason or another moved their blog from Advogato. It is provided as a service to those who would like to read the "greater Advogato" community.

This site works only as a Planet, it aggregates the post only, to comment on a blog entry, click on the title or time to go to the blog entry on the original site, hopefully it will have a comment facility.

July 23, 2014

Bastien Nocera [hadess]

Watch out for DRI3 regressions

DRI3 has plenty of necessary fixes for X.org and Wayland, but it's still young in its integration. It's been integrated in the upcoming Fedora 21, and recently in Arch as well.

If WebKitGTK+ applications hang or become unusably slow when an HTML5 video is supposed to be, you might be hitting this bug.

If Totem crashes on startup, it's likely this problem, reported against cogl for now.

Feel free to add a comment if you see other bugs related to DRI3, or have more information about those.

Update: Wayland is already perfect, and doesn't use DRI3. The "DRI2" structures in Mesa are just that, structures. With Wayland, the DRI2 protocol isn't actually used.

July 23, 2014 12:18 PM

Eric Anholt [anholt]

vc4 driver month 1

I've just pushed the vc4-sim-validate branch to my Mesa tree. It's the culmination of the last week's worth pondering and false starts since I got my first texture sampling in simulation last Wednesday.

Handling texturing on vc4 safely is a pain. The pointer to texture contents doesn't appear in the normal command stream, and instead it's in the uniform stream. Which uniform happens to contain the pointer depends on how many uniforms have been loaded by the time you get to the QPU_W_TMU[01]_[STRB] writes. Since there's no iommu, I can't trust userspace to tell me where the uniform is, otherwise I'd be allowing them to just lie and put in physical addresses and read arbitrary system memory.

This meant I had to write a shader parser for the kernel, have that spit out a collection of references to texture samples, switch the uniform data from living in BOs in the user -> kernel ABI and instead be passed in as normal system memory that gets copied to the temporary exec bo, and then do relocations on that.

Instead of trying to write this in the kernel, with a ~10 minute turnaround time per test run, I copied my kernel code into Mesa with a little bit of wrapper code to give a kernel-like API environment, and did my development on that. When I'm looking at possibly 100s of iterations to get all the validation code working, it was well worth the day spent to build that infrastructure so that I could get my testing turnaround time down to about 15 sec.

I haven't done actual validation to make sure that the texture samples don't access outside of the bounds of the texture yet (though I at least have the infrastructure necessary now), just like I haven't done that validation for so many other pointers (vertex fetch, tile load/stores, etc.). I also need to copy the code back out to the kernel driver, and it really deserves some cleanups to add sanity to the many different addresses involved (unvalidated vaddr, validated vaddr, and validated paddr of the data for each of render, bin, shader recs, uniforms). But hopefully once I do that, I can soon start bringing up glamor on the Pi (though I've got some major issue with tile allocation BO memory management before anything's stable on the Pi).

July 23, 2014 12:41 AM

July 22, 2014

Don Marti [dmarti]

How to beat adtech fraud: REGISTER ALL HUMANS

Ted McConnell, on AdExchanger: Advertising Fraud: It’s Time For Asymmetrical Warfare.

When you have an enemy that’s shape-shifting, agile, belligerent, invisible, greedy, fast and brilliant, you have a problem. Welcome to what military strategy people call asymmetrical warfare. It looks like terrorism. They lie about their identity. They only have to be right once. There are no lines in the sand. You can’t tell them from the good guys. They adapt.

I's actually worse than that. The best fraud rings only have to be better than the worst ad networks. The fraud perpetrators get to pick which network to attack, while the network doesn't get to pick which fraud perpetrators it deals with. The feedback for fraud is relatively quick. It's cheap and easy to try it on a small scale by buying or generating a little bit of bad traffic and seeing what happens. It's easy to decouple the parts of fraud that you're good at from the parts that you need help on, because that's how adtech is networked to begin with. Finally, the expected consequences of failure are small.

Where this piece gets problematic is in suggested solutions for dealing with the adtech fraud problem while keeping the adtech system intact. (Adtech, privacy, and fraud control, you can only have two.) Of course, this means abandoning privacy.

For example, "Make a publicly provided 'white list' of humans, accessible as a service to all transactions," and "tighten up Internet access...make sure an antivirus is in place." So in order to beat adtech fraud, McConnell wants to have (1) a white list of all humans and (2) control over all client systems (to verify that antivirus). Even the DRM maximalists didn't get that much.

And what happens while this perfect system of total control is being rolled out? Older clients, and humans who aren't on the white list of humans, will still be out there, so most of the fraud gets to continue. And by the time the system of control is in place, someone will subvert it for legit reasons.

If total Internet lockdown isn't going to happen, how do you beat fraud? A better answer is to turn the privacy up, not down: Adtech fraud: you can't cheat an honest man.

Bonus links:

Jon Udell: It’s time to engineer some filter failure

Atul: Does Privacy Matter?

Tim Peterson: Angry Birds Maker Rovio Points Finger at Ad Networks Over NSA Data Leak

Randall Rothenberg, president and CEO of the Interactive Advertising Bureau: IAB Head: 'The Digital Advertising Industry Must Stop Having Unprotected Sex' (via The Drift from Upstream)

David Rogers: Bad adbots and the vanishing CMO

Robin Hanson: Why Do Firms Buy Ads?

Ted Dhanik: We're All Responsible for Click Fraud and Here's How to Stop It

Doug Weaver: Dead internet ideas: The "right" to target

July 22, 2014 12:20 PM

Mary Gardiner [hypatia]

Opt-in Creative Commons licencing plugin for WordPress?

Does anyone have a recommendation for an opt-in Creative Commons licencing plugin for WordPress. That is, one where the default state is not to CC licence something, but when some action is taken, an individual post or page can be so licenced.

As background: I have no desire to write, maintain, or even debug a WordPress plugin. I want to know if there is something for this use case that Just Works.

I want opt-in, because it is too hard to remember, or to train others, to find an opt-out box when posting, and thus end up CC licensing things that weren’t intended to be, or can’t be, released under such a licence.

Some options I’ve already looked into:

WP License reloaded: was pretty much exactly what I wanted but doesn’t seem to be actively maintained and is now failing (possibly because the site in question is now hosted on SSL, I’m not sure, see above about not being interested in debugging).

Creative Commons Configurator: seems to be the most actively maintained CC plugin, but seems to be opt-out, and even that was only introduced recently.

Creative Commons Generator: opt-out.

Easy CC License: perhaps what I want, although I’d rather do this with an options dialogue of some kind than a shortcode.

July 22, 2014 07:11 AM

July 21, 2014

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

enter price

I am in the chemist's waiting for a prescription to be filled, and eavesdropping.

Customer, to assistant: How much is this?
Assistant: (scans it repeatedly) Dunno.
Pharmacist: What's up?
Assistant: Every time I scan this, it just says "enter price", "enter price".
Marn: (under breath) These are the voyages of the Starship Enter Price...
(Pharmacist laughs. Assistant looks confused.)
Pharmacist: Well, *I* thought it was funny.

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/306752.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

July 21, 2014 08:57 PM

July 20, 2014

Mary Gardiner [hypatia]

The Sydney Project: Luna Park

This year is my son’s last year before he begins full time schooling in 2015. Welcome to our year of child-focussed activities in Sydney.

Luna Park entrance

by Jan Smith, CC BY

Luna Park is, honestly, essentially cheating on this project. Do children like amusement parks? Yes. They do. There you go.

In addition, I think four years old is basically about the right age for them. It’s old enough that children are aware that a giant painted face, tinkly music, and carousels aren’t a completely normal day in the world, young enough that the carousel is still just as magical as the dodgem cars. And too young to have horror-film associations with amusement parks, I think that helps too.

Luna Park ferris wheel

by Kevin Gibbons, CC BY

It’s also more accessible to a four year old than some more thrill-oriented parks. V isn’t scared of heights or speed, so he loves the Coney Island slides, and was annoyed to find out that he was too short for the Ranger (the ship you sit in that gets spun upside down about ten stories in the air) and the free-fall ride. He is, however, apparently afraid of centrifugal force parallel to the ground, and refused to go on any “octopus” rides.

Even the four year old who wants to go on the free-fall ride is still young enough for, well, frankly dinky rides like the train that goes around about five times in a circle while you pretend to drive it, and the space shuttles that turn in gentle circles and which slowly go up and down when you press a button. His big draw is the ferris wheel, which I found fairly horrifying this time as I read the signs about keeping limbs inside to him and then had to answer a lot of questions about “why? why do I have to keep my limbs inside?” while giant pieces of metal calmly whirled past us with their comparatively infinite strength. In a similar vein, V also enjoys the roller coaster past all reason and sense, whereas Andrew and I react with “this seems… flimsy…” (I love coasters, but I like them to look overengineered).

Luna Park, where there's still a space shuttle

The only things V really didn’t like were the organised dancing groups who were encouraging children to learn their (cute!) 1930s-ish moves, and the process of choosing a child from a hat to press the lever to light up the park at night (he refused to let his name be entered), because there’s some specific types of performative attention that he really loathes. But there’s plenty of children gagging to dance along and to light up the park that an objector goes unnoticed. It’s not coercive fun.

Cost: entry is free. Rides aren’t, an unlimited rides pass for the day starts at $29.95 for a young child and goes to $49.95 for a tall child or an adult. There are discounts for buying online. (The entry is free thing sounds really useless, but it’s actually good if you have several adults, not all of whom are interested in the rides and/or are looking after babies.)

Recommended: indeed. We’ve considered getting an annual pass, in fact.

More information: Luna Park Sydney website.

Disclosure: because of a prior complaint to Luna Park about opening hours (we showed up several months ago at 2:15pm to find that an advertised 4pm closure had been moved to 3pm), we were admitted free this time. No reviews were requested or promised in return for our admission.

July 20, 2014 11:52 PM

Hubert Figuière [hub]

Going to Guadec

For the first time since 2008, when it was in Istanbul, I'm coming to Guadec. This time it is in Strasbourg, France. Thanks to a work week scheduled just before in Paris.

I won't present anything this year, but I hope to be able to catch up a bit more with the Gnome community. I was already at the summit last fall, as it was being held in Montréal, but Guadec participation is usually broader and wider.

July 20, 2014 10:58 PM

July 19, 2014

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

kids' fascination with death

As a littl'un, my daughter was interested not only in Ancient Egypt but also in the Soap Lady in the Mütter museum-- a corpse which has become entirely saponified, turned to the soapy substance called adipocere. One day, when my daughter was about five, I was sitting reading while she was playing in the park, and eavesdropping on her conversation with another girl:

Other Girl: "Do you know what happens to you when you die?"
Rio: "Yes. You turn into soap."
Other Girl: "No... you turn into stone. I know because my grandma died and I touched her and she was as cold as a stone."

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/306537.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

July 19, 2014 08:06 PM

Don Marti [dmarti]

Surfacing, not hiding, the creepy?

Let's look at the scorecard for the surveillance marketing game. The mainstream coverage would choose up sides like so:

  • Advertisers (brand and direct reponse)
  • Adtech vendors
  • Ad-supported sites
  • Authors
  • Users
  • Platform vendors

vs.

  • Elitist Internet greybeards
  • Privacy hackers
  • Unaccountable Eurocrats
  • Fraud perpetrators

Not so good for the privacy side. But if you do some research, the scorecard probably actually looks like so:

  • Direct response advertisers
  • Low-value ad-supported sites
  • Adtech vendors
  • Fraud perpetrators
  • Dominant platform vendor

vs.

  • Brand advertisers
  • High-value ad-supported sites
  • Authors
  • Users
  • Elitist Internet greybeards
  • Privacy hackers
  • Unaccountable Eurocrats
  • Smaller/new platform vendors

Quite a difference. If you're a platform vendor using privacy as a selling point, how do you make the user aware of it? Most platforms try to conceal tracking. But if you're working with the creeped-out feeling instead of trying to soothe it, you need to give the user a little hint of, "Gosh, I'm glad I didn't step in that!" in the same way that a mail application shows you the count of messages in your spam folder. For example, users could get a notification when entering the range of a new wireless shopper tracker, then have the option to hush it up.

The dreaded "Do you want to accept this cookie?" dialog could even be simplified. Instead of presenting the cookie with no context, you could get...

Do you want to accept tracking by example.com? This site appears on the following lists:

  • Companies that Hate Freedom (Freedom Lovers of America)

  • Puppy Kickers List (International Puppy Lovers League)

Block this site / Block all sites covered by both of these lists / Accept tracking

The challenge is to add just enough "look how I'm protecting your privacy—aren't I a good little device?" to keep the user uneasy when he or she uses something else.

July 19, 2014 02:07 PM

July 18, 2014

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

ttto TheI'm a centaur, I'm a centaur, From Manchester way I drink lots of beer an Manchester Rambler

I'm a centaur, I'm a centaur,
From Manchester way
I drink lots of beer and

I eat lots of hay
I may be a man at my neckline
But from the waist down I'm an equine.
This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/306328.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

July 18, 2014 11:03 PM

"duck tape"

The earliest OED citation for "duck tape" (in the modern sense) is from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 21 November 1902, and it says:

"Considering... that 100,000 yards of cotton duck tape must be wrapped around the cable [of the Williamsburg bridge] with neatness and exactitude, it may be imagined that this method of cable preservation is quite expensive."
 
"Duck" is a strong cotton fabric which duck tape is made from; it's also used to make sails and trousers. I don't know when it became a trademark in the US. "Duct tape" came later, around the 1970s; it is of course very often used to tape up cables in ducts.
This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/306087.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

July 18, 2014 08:10 PM

Don Marti [dmarti]

Opportunity in surveillance marketing consolidation?

In the surveillance marketing business, a bunch of companies that started off in different places have all ending up doing the same thing. A company that started as a 1980s dial-up online service is competing with a company that started as a 1990s web portal and both are competing with social networks and post-bro lean 21st-century whatevers. It's like sailors, merchants, and farmers all abandoning their original occupations and all headed out to pan for the same gold.

But is the surveillance marketing gold rush coming to its natural end? Are we entering the consolidation phase, at least on mobile devices? Derek Thompson: A Handful of Tech Companies Own the Vast Majority of Mobile Ads. Google, Facebook, Pandora, Twitter, and Apple have 75%, and a quarter of the pie is left for the rest.

So what happens to the losers?

As soon as you accept that your company is a loser in the surveillance marketing game, you get to stop repeating the same old Big Data jive and come up with something new. As far as I can tell, everyone on the whole Lumascape has the same Unique Selling Proposition. Which is not really the point as uniqueness goes.

Look, it's a basic marketing exercise. Lots of variants, but basically, you try to fill in something like this.

[Product] is the only [category] that [benefit] for [market] by [core competency].

Ready? Here goes.

[example.com] is the only [adtech intermediary] that [maximizes ROI] for [advertisers] by [creepy data collection and difficult math].

The "only" looks funny there, doesn't it? That is exactly as differentiated as:

[Joe Bloggs] is the only [random guy panning for gold] who [finds the most gold] by [panning for gold in this spot right here].

Boring. It's a recipe for consolidation of an industry. So losing could be the best thing that ever happened to you.

What's the alternative? Well, Microsoft seems to have part of the answer. Violet Blue writes, Second, using Android phones, I'm Google's lab rat and fighting back a continual invasiveness from a company that's really starting to freak me out.

Now we're getting somewhere. Sounds like a point of actual differentiation to me.

What if a vendor used its marketing power to amplify user feelings of unease about surveillance marketing, instead of trying to soothe them? Work with the creeped-out feeling, not agagainst it? Let's do that USP exercise again.

[Microsoft] is the only [productivity platform vendor] that [protects mental and economic integrity] for [users] by [blocking attempts to collect information about you].

That's something to work with, but it's just the start. A message without anything to back it up is as useless as the Scroogled campaign. Pointless. But if you build a security and privacy story keeping the USP in mind, within a couple of releases you've got something.

Clearly nobody in the IT industry is ready to give up getting a piece of the surveillance marketing business yet. But for whoever does first, the opportunity is waiting.

Bonus links

BOB HOFFMAN: The Dumbest People On Earth?

Tim Fernholz: Does the advertising business that built Google actually work?

Alex Kantrowitz: Ad-Tech Companies Form Group to Standardize User ID

The Tech Block: The truth about Google and evil

John Gruber: Privacy as a Competitive Advantage for Apple

BOB HOFFMAN: Misintermediation

Ricardo Bilton: Publishers’ plug-in addiction can come back to haunt them

Christof Wittig: Why mobile advertising isn’t as huge as it’s hyped to be (yet)

eaon pritchard: does culture really eat strategy for breakfast?

datacoup: What the brokers have broken: Shifting the conversation from Privacy to Control

Sam Thielman: This Is How Your Financial Data Is Being Used to Serve You Ads

MediaPost | Metrics Insider: Why Offline Data Is Key To Online Data Segmentation

MediaPost | Mobile Insider: Get This Crap Off My Phone: We Are Screwing Up The Mobile Experience

Lee Hutchinson: Op-Ed: Microsoft layoff e-mail typifies inhuman corporate insensitivity

July 18, 2014 11:21 AM

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

airship

"My heart leaps up when I behold
An airship in the sky:
So was it with R101,
So was it once at Cardington,
So be it, if I shall behold
Or if I fly."

(with apologies to Wordsworth)

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/305778.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

July 18, 2014 10:48 AM

July 17, 2014

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

Gentle Readers: gold is for the mistress

Gentle Readers
a newsletter made for sharing
volume 1, number 14
17th July 2014: gold is for the mistress
What I’ve been up to

 

Forgive, if you will, the brevity of today's Gentle Readers. I am in the midst of tidying the place we're leaving, and putting things into bags and boxes ready for the move. And though it's a small two-bedroom flat, it contains upwards of four thousand books, so the operation is taking most of my attention and energy. (Also, it caused some talk when I went into Sainsbury's and bought forty bags-for-life.)

I also apologise for the state of the website. We finish moving in on Tuesday (at least, I sincerely hope we do), and then I will have time to fix it. Video versions of Gentle Readers will also resume thereafter.

I have been reading Jeremy Taylor's Rules and Exercises of Holy Living, a sort of self-help book from 1650. Taylor talks about many of the same sorts of things as modern self-help books, including how to organise your time and how not to get distracted. In the section on time management he mentions that it's important to do something fun every day, because it refreshes your mind; he goes on to say that a good example of this is that St John the Apostle spent time each day with a tame partridge. This surprised me.

Gentle reader Amy Robinson requested a picture of St John spending quality time with his partridge, and I am happy to oblige:

http://thomasthurman.org/pics/st-john-with-partridge

A poem of mine

One of the interesting things about being a writer is that you find people talking about and using your work in ways you'd never considered. A few years after I wrote the poem below, I happened upon the website for a translation competition at a Russian university; the students had been set some texts by German writers whose names I didn't recognise, and James Thurber, and my poem. I love getting surprises like that.

TRANSLATION (T83)

Ah, would I were a German!
I'd trouble my translator
With nouns the size of Hamburg
And leave the verb till later.

And if I were a Welshman
My work would thwart translation
With ninety novel plurals
In strict alliteration.

And would I were Chinese!
I'd throw them off their course
With twelve unusual symbols
All homophones of “horse”.

But as it is, I'm English:
And I'm the one in hell
By writing in a language
Impossible to spell.

A picture

 
http://thomasthurman.org/pics/heaven-lies

Something from someone else

This is about as subtle as a brick, but Kipling knew his trade, and it still holds the beauty and jingle of a nursery rhyme. As with all the poems in Puck of Pook's Hill and Rewards and Fairies, it's attached to a story about Dan and Una in the original book; this story for this one is also called "Cold Iron", but unlike the poem, it concerns the iron taboo.
 
COLD IRON
by Rudyard Kipling

"Gold is for the mistress — silver for the maid!
Copper for the craftsman cunning at his trade."
"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall,
"But Iron — Cold Iron — is master of them all!"

So he made rebellion 'gainst the King his liege,
Camped before his citadel and summoned it to siege.
"Nay!" said the cannoneer on the castle wall,
"But Iron — Cold Iron — shall be master of you all!"

Woe for the Baron and his knights so strong,
When the cruel cannon-balls laid 'em all along!
He was taken prisoner, he was cast in thrall,
And Iron — Cold Iron — was master of it all!

Yet his King spake kindly (ah, how kind a lord!)
"What if I release thee now, and give thee back thy sword?"
"Nay!" said the Baron, "mock not at my fall,
For Iron — Cold Iron — is master of men all."

"Tears are for the craven, prayers are for the clown —
Halters for the silly neck that cannot keep a crown.
As my loss is grievous, so my hope is small,
For Iron — Cold Iron — must be master of men all!"

Yet his King made answer (few such kings there be!)
"Here is Bread and here is Wine — sit and sup with me.
Eat and drink in Mary's name, the whiles I do recall
How Iron — Cold Iron — can be master of men all!"

He took the Wine and blessed It; He blessed and brake the Bread
With His own Hands He served Them, and presently He said:
"Look! These Hands they pierced with nails outside My city wall
Show Iron — Cold Iron — to be master of men all!

"Wounds are for the desperate, blows are for the strong,
Balm and oil for weary hearts all cut and bruised with wrong.
I forgive thy treason — I redeem thy fall —
For Iron — Cold Iron — must be master of men all!"

"Crowns are for the valiant — sceptres for the bold!
Thrones and powers for mighty men who dare to take and hold."
"Nay!" said the Baron, kneeling in his hall,
"But Iron — Cold Iron — is master of man all!
Iron out of Calvary is master of men all!"

Colophon

Gentle Readers is published on Mondays and Thursdays, and I want you to share it. The archives are at http://thomasthurman.org/gentle/ , and so is a form to get on the mailing list. If you have anything to say or reply, or you want to be added or removed from the mailing list, I’m at thomas@thurman.org.uk and I’d love to hear from you. The newsletter is reader-supported; please pledge something if you can afford to, and please don't if you can't. Love and peace to you all.

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/305463.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

July 17, 2014 11:00 PM

limericks

Only yesterday I mentioned to Alice that I spent my first day in my school's Special Educational Needs Unit helping the teachers write limericks. In one of those weird synchronicity things, I found the limericks today in the back of a book of poetry, in Mrs Price's handwriting. Internal evidence dates it to 1987. I apologise to my siblings in general:

There was a young fellow called Thomas
Who always showed plenty of promise
At science he scored
At PE was bored
That flourishing artist called Thomas

There was a young fellow named Mark
Who went out for a bit of a lark
He jumped in the lake
While eating some cake
And got himself banned from the park

There was a young lady named Mandy (Amanda)
Whose favourite food was candy.
So into the shop
With a skip and a hop
She grabbed every sweet that was handy

There was a young fellow named Andrew
Who's now reached the great age of two.
He has two teddy bears.
They both live upstairs.
The real ones all live in the zoo.

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/305215.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

July 17, 2014 06:35 PM

God versus Zamenhof

Sometimes I hear people saying that they believe morality to be designed by God, and so they can't understand how atheists and agnostics can have an understanding of morality. This is not an argument I can easily get my head around. I mean, if we talk about languages for a moment, there's still no consensus on how humans as a whole started to speak. But it's still pretty obvious that individual humans learn language as they grow up from the people around them, that language exists by consensus, and that there are certain necessary features for language to be language. I don't see Esperantists going around telling everyone that they can't understand how we can speak English if we don't know who started Proto-Indo-European.

ETA:  Then again, if the Esperantists did do that, I probably wouldn't understand too well anyway.

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/305102.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

July 17, 2014 03:31 PM