Planet (Former) Advogato

This is a complement to Advogato, it is an aggregation of blogs of those who used to post on Advogato, but for one reason or another moved their blog from Advogato. It is provided as a service to those who would like to read the "greater Advogato" community.

This site works only as a Planet, it aggregates the post only, to comment on a blog entry, click on the title or time to go to the blog entry on the original site, hopefully it will have a comment facility.

February 13, 2016

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

that's powerful stuff

Today I tried a sip of my dad's cask-strength whisky. Amelia was there to record the result.

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/357795.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

February 13, 2016 11:46 PM

February 12, 2016

Pierre Phaneuf [pphaneuf]

Einstürzende Neubauten - Installation Nr. 1 (John is mixing)

Not entirely sure why, but flooded with memories today, this year, 11 years after.

Having run down to the metro, up to the apartment, up to the hospital. At about this time, sitting around with friends, looking at each others, with the phone ringing, knowing it was her mother's weekly call. All the people who came to help, in an amazing storm of friendship, telling each others stories, and managing to laugh together. That great service, that I still haven't listened to the recording of. Sitting on the floor in her empty room after everyone had gone, with a bright winter blue sky, crying. Her piano in my living room, with Diva whining at it.

She shaped my life in so many ways, I'm so glad I knew her, however briefly.

February 12, 2016 01:21 PM

Michael Terry [mterry]

FastMail is the Perfect Gmail Alternative

If, for whatever reason, you’re looking to switch from Gmail, I think you’ll love FastMail.

Its workflow, interface, and features will be immediately recognizable to you: it has conversation view, archiving, spam detection, categorization, filtering, keyboard shortcuts, a modern and fast web UI (ditto for mobile), fast search, calendars, contacts, two-factor authentication, and the option to use your own domain name.

I’ve looked around and having even just that first one (a conversation view) is a shocking rarity in either webmail or mail apps. Let alone all those features.

Switching is easy too. You can import email directly from Gmail and can just export/import any calendars and contacts from Google. Plus, for any shared calendars that you still want to host at Google, you can have FastMail show them and sync any changes.

The big catch of course is that it isn’t free. But it’s not expensive either.

I know this post reads like an ad, but I’m just genuinely pleased so far (and I’m intentionally not using a referral code on the link above). Hopefully the next person doesn’t have to do as much comparison shopping as I did.

February 12, 2016 12:11 AM

February 09, 2016

Thomas Thurman [marnanel]

"Mikrokosmographia"

"Mikrokosmographia" by Helkiah Crooke (1576-1635) was the first book in English to use the word "clitoris". Oddly, there's not much of the book online [edit: there's a blog!] But here's page 238, where he explains about orgasms, lesbians, and squirting. I've modernised the spelling a bit.

"Although for the most part it hath but a small production hidden under the Nymphes [==labia], and hard to be felt but with curiosity, yet sometimes it groweth to such a length that it hangeth without the cleft like a man's member, especially when it is fretted with the touch of the cloaths, and so strutteth and groweth to a rigidity as doth the yard of a man. And this part it is which those wicked women do abuse called Tribades (often mentioned by many authors, and in some states worthily punished) to their mutual and unnatural lusts.

The use of this part is the same with the bridle of the yard [==the frenulum of the penis]; for because the Testicles of the women [==ovaries] are far distant from the yard [==penis] of the man, the imagination is carried to the spermatical vessels by the motion and attrition of this Clitoris, together with the lower ligatures of the womb, whose original [==the cervix] toucheth, cleaveth and is tied to the leading vessels of the seed. And so the profusion of their seed is stirred up for generation, for which business it was not necessary it should be large. Wherefore although by this passage their seed is not ejaculated, yet by the attrition of it their imagination is wrought to call that out that lieth deeply hidden in the body, and hence it is called "aestrum Veneris" & "dulcedo amoris". For in it with the ligaments inserted into it is, the especial seat of delight in their veneral embracements, as [Renaldus] Columbus imagineth he first discovered.

For Nature [...] hath given to all creatures both the instruments of conception, and hath also infused into them a strange and violent kind of delight, that none of the kinds of the creatures should perish but remain ever (after a sort) immortal. And truly it was very necessary that there should be a kind of pleasant force or violence in the Nature of mankind to transport him out of himself, or beside himself as it were, in the act of generation; to which otherwise (being master of himself) he would hardly have been drawn; which ecstasy (for it is called a little epilepsy, or falling sickness) is caused by the touch of the seed upon the nervous and quick-sensed parts as it passeth by them."

This entry was originally posted at http://marnanel.dreamwidth.org/357488.html. Please comment there using OpenID.

February 09, 2016 07:41 PM

February 08, 2016

Michael Still [mikal]

Adolf Hitler: My Part in His Downfall




ISBN: 9780241958094
LibraryThing
This is another book I read as a teenager and decided to re-read. Frankly, its great. Confused teenager signs up for the British Army (or is conscripted, its not totally clear) and ends up as an artillery gunner. Has hilarious adventures while managing to still be a scrawny nerd. I loved it. A light hearted look at a difficult topic.

Tags for this post: book spike_milligan combat ww2 biography
Related posts: Cryptonomicon; The Man in the Rubber Mask; Skimpy; The Crossroad; Don't Tell Mum I Work On The Rigs; Some Girls: My Life in a Harem
Comment

February 08, 2016 09:30 AM

Halo: The Flood




ISBN: 076532833X
LibraryThing
The reviews online for this book aren't great, and frankly they're right. The plot is predictable, and there isn't much character development. Just lots and lots of blow-by-blow combat. It gets wearing after a while, and I found this book at bit of a slog. Not recommended.

Tags for this post: book william_c_dietz combat halo engineered_human cranial_computer personal_ai aliens
Related posts: Halo: The Fall of Reach; The Last Colony ; The End of All Things; The Human Division; Old Man's War ; The Ghost Brigades
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February 08, 2016 09:22 AM

Rachel Chalmers [rachel]

adventure time: sausalito

The Week of All the Deathiversaries, which I have taken to calling Shark Week for short, ended with some kind of football game which I resolved to go to the far end of our metropolitan area in order to avoid.

Pretty safe to say that we have, as a family, grown fond of kayaking. Among the floating homes of Sausalito we discovered this round, glassy lagoon. Venice has nothin’ on us.

I would also like to call out this colony of harbor seals for some really fine achievements in lolling.

I like it here.

February 08, 2016 03:13 AM